Beef Short-Rib Rendang

To make a great rendang you need to first understand what a rendang is. It’s a fragrant stew more than a curry, and the aromas of the galangal, ginger and turmeric should be more prominent than the hard spices. Turmeric leaves are more traditional than makrut (kaffir) lime but they are very hard to find in Australia.

 

Ingredients

2 medium onions or 8 eschallots, peeled and roughly chopped

4 cloves garlic, peeled

2-6 bird’s eye chillies, stalks removed (as you prefer)

5cm each fresh turmeric, galangal and ginger, peeled and roughly chopped

3 stalks lemongrass, fat stalks only, bruised

¼ cup vegetable oil or coconut oil

2kg beef short ribs (

400ml coconut cream

6 makrut lime (kaffir lime) leaves

1 piece cassia bark

2 star anise

1 tbsp caster sugar

2 tsp salt

1 cup dessicated coconut

 

Method

  1. Combine the onion, garlic, chilli, turmeric, galangal and ginger in a blender and blend to a puree, adding a little water if necessary to help it blend. Heat the oil in a large, heavy casserole dish over medium heat and fry the paste for 15-30 minutes (the more water you add to the paste, the longer you will need to cook it to evaporate the water before it starts to fry), stirring occasionally at the beginning and constantly as it thickens so that it doesn’t splatter or catch on the base of the pan. This paste, known as a rempah, is ready when it is browned, fragrant and thick.
  2. Add the beef ribs and toss to coat in the rempah. Then add the coconut cream and enough water to barely cover the ribs. Add 3 of the makrut lime leaves, cassia, star anise, sugar and salt. Bring to a simmer and cover and simmer for about 2-2.5 hours, stirring occasionally until the beef starts to become tender. Remove the lid and simmer for about 1 hour more, stirring occasionally again until the stewing liquid is reduced to a thick, very oily sauce.
  3. Heat a dry frying pan over low-medium heat and add the coconut. Fry the coconut, stirring constantly until it is a deep golden brown and add the coconut to the rendang, stirring to combine. This caramelised coconut is known as kerisik. Cook for a further 30 minutes or so at simmering heat until deep brown, oily and thick. The rendang can be eaten straight away but will benefit from being covered and left overnight to develop. Finely shred the remaining makrut lime leaves and scatter over the rendang to serve.

 

Some Extra Tips

Don’t overdo the spices. A rendang should take the fragrances of galangal, turmeric, lemongrass, makrut lime and ginger before being overwhelmed with spices. I put a bit of whole cassia and star anise in mine but I’ve seen recipes that use cumin, coriander etc. There’s nothing wrong with that, but I just don’t think it’s necessary.

Cook everything for a looooong time. Both the rempah and the rendang itself. Like a Spanish soffrito, a rempah takes time to develop flavour. Mine is just blended onion (or shallot), garlic, ginger, galangal, chilli and fresh turmeric. The rendang, too, needs to cook for long enough to crack the coconut cream and reduce down so that beef is essentially frying in the coconut oil.

It’s up to you how wet or dry you want your rendang to be. Some can be as wet as a very thick soup, and others completely dry, almost like jerky. It all depends on how long you reduce the stew for (i.e. how long you cook it uncovered vs. covered), and how long you let if fry in the separated coconut oil.

The kerisik is the key the rendang’s texture. Some recipes don’t include this but it’s mandatory in my opinion. Kerisik is caramelised coconut (toasted dessicated is fine, but historically it’s caramelised coconut meat). It deepens the flavour of the rendang and thickens it as well.

Rendang needs time to mature. Make it a day or two before you want to eat it if you can.

You can make this with other stewing cuts of beef like chuck, or even with lamb shanks.

Enjoy!

27 Recipes from April 2016

Roundup

I just realised that for all the hundreds of recipes that I write every year between my columns, books, TV series and so on, I put very few of them up on this site. Of course they’re always available if you want to search for them, but it might just be easier for me to collect the links together for you all so that you can access them all here.

So here’s the first in my monthly roundup of recipes you can all try. They’re all online. And they’re all free. Enjoy!

 

Superior Soup

Superior Soup

 

Spaghetti with zucchini and spinach

Green Pasta

 

Sago with coconut and melon

Sago, melon and coconut soup

 

Salmon salad with green tahini dressing

Green Tahini Salmon

 

Swedish meatballs in cream sauce

 

Danish baked pork belly with parsley sauce

Custom (1 of 8)

 

Semla (Swedish cardamom buns)

 

Real-deal carne asada tacos

 

Mexican sweet pumpkin flan

Sweet Pumpkin Flan

 

Thursday pea soup with rye and spelt pancakes

Custom (7 of 8)

 

Dutch baby with bananas and berries

 

Green shakshuka with hummus

 

Rainbow salad

Rainbow Salad

 

Swedish onion tart with sour cream and salmon roe

 

Roast chicken with VIVs (Very Important Vegetables)

 

Glazed wild boar with double-sided Hasselback potatoes

 

“The Lawyer’s Lunch” smørrebrød

 

Danish apple doughnuts (Æbleskivers)

 

Double dumpling chicken soup (Hønsekødsuppe)

 

Viking salmon with skagen sauce

 

Raspberry and marzipan spandauer

Custom (3 of 8)

 

 

 

Chicken Kra-pow

Krapow-Gram-(1-of-1)

CLICK HERE TO WATCH A VIDEO OF THIS RECIPE.

This might just be the easiest Thai recipe I know. Just a few ingredients in perfect balance for a delicious and authentic meal.

Ingredients

3 cloves garlic
2 large red chilies, seeds removed
500g chicken thigh (you can use breast, or a mixture of the two)
1 tbsp oyster sauce
2 tbsp vegetable oil
2 tbsp fish sauce
½ tsp caster sugar
1 ½ cups loosely packed Thai basil leaves
a wedge of lime and a fried egg (optional), to serve 

 

Method

  1. Roughly chop the garlic and chilli together on a board. In a separate bowl, coarsely chop the chicken to your preferred consistency and mix through the oyster sauce.
  2. Heat a wok and add in the oil. Fry the garlic and chili for a few minutes until fragrant and then add in the chicken. Mix the chicken with the chilli and garlic and distribute it over the surface of the wok for a minute or two to caramelise slightly. Toss, then allow to sit in contact with the wok again for another minute. Add in the fish sauce and sugar, toss and continue to fry for another minute or so, moistening with a little water or stock if it starts to get too dry.
  3. Stir through the basil leaves and remove from the heat. Top with a fried egg if you like, and serve with rice and a wedge of lime.

This recipe appears in my third book, Asian After Work.

Asian After Work

 

Steamed Ginger Chicken

Steamed Ginger Chicken

Watch a video of how to make this recipe here.

Ingredients

600g chicken thigh fillets

1 tbsp grated ginger

1 tbsp Shaoxing wine

1 tsp soy sauce

1 tsp cornflour

½ tsp salt

½ tsp sugar

2 spring onions, finely chopped

¼ cup coriander leaves, to serve

Method

  1. Cut the chicken pieces into 5cm chunks. Mix the chicken with the ginger, Shaoxing wine, soy sauce, cornflour, salt, sugar and spring onions. Set aside to marinate for at least 15 minutes.
  2. Arrange the chicken in a single layer over a heatproof serving plate that will fit inside your steamer. Bring the water under the bamboo steamer to a boil and place the plate of chicken inside. Cover the steamer and steam for 10 minutes for boneless pieces, and 12 minutes for pieces on the bone.
  3. Remove the plate from the steamer and allow to stand for a minute. Scatter the chicken with the coriander and serve immediately.

This recipe is from my book, Asian Cookery School. I hope you like it!

Watch a video of how to make this recipe here.

Adam Liaw's Asian Cookery School

Beef and broccoli

Beef and Broccoli

Ingredients

500g rump steak, very thinly sliced on an angle

2 cups broccoli florets

2 tbsp peanut oil

1 small onion, peeled and thinly sliced

3 thin slices of ginger, bruised

3 cloves garlic, roughly chopped

¼ cup oyster sauce

1 tbsp soy sauce

½ tsp sugar

2 tbsp Coarse stock, Chicken stock or water

1 tsp cornflour mixed with 1 tbsp cold stock or water

Meat marinade

1 tbsp soy sauce

1 tbsp Shaoxing wine

1 tsp sesame oil

½ tsp cornflour

a pinch of white pepper

 

Method

  1. Combine the beef with the meat marinade ingredients and marinate for at least 10 minutes.
  2. Heat about a cup of water in the wok until boiling, add dash of oil and blanche the broccoli for about 1 minute until it is bight green and slightly softened. Drain and set aside until ready to fry.
  3. Drain the water from the wok and dry the wok over the flame. Add about 2 tbsp oil and add the ginger first then the garlic to the oil, then the onion and fry until the onion is softened. Scoop the onion, ginger and garlic out of the oil and add to the broccoli. Using the flavoured oil left in the wok, fry the beef in batches until well browned. Return all the ingredients back into the wok and toss together. Add the the oyster sauce, soy sauce, stock and sugar and toss to coat. Slowly drizzle the cornflour mixture into the wok while tossing until the liquids thicken and cling to the ingredients. Immediately remove to a plate, rest for a moment and serve with rice and little chilli in soy sauce.

This recipe can be found in my book, Adam Liaw’s Asian Cookery School.

Adam Liaw's Asian Cookery School

Taiwanese Popcorn Chicken

Taiwanese Popcorn Chicken

Watch a video of this recipe here.

Taiwanese food is a great mix of local dishes with influences from China, Japan and Southeast Asia. Popcorn chicken is a popular street food and once you try it you’ll see why. The crunchy texture of the sweet potato flour coating is incredible.

Ingredients

600g boneless chicken thigh fillets, preferably skin-on

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 tsp grated ginger

1 tbsp soy sauce

1 tbsp Shaoxing wine

2 tsp sugar

½ tsp five spice powder

1 cup sweet potato flour

2L oil, for deep frying

1 cup loosely packed Thai basil leaves

Spiced Salt

1 tbsp salt

¼ tsp five spice powder

¼ tsp white pepper

a pinch of chilli powder

Method

  1. Slice the chicken into 3cm pieces and combine with the garlic, ginger, soy sauce, Shaoxing wine, sugar and five spice powder and set aside to marinate for at least 10 minutes. Toss in the sweet potato flour, shaking off any excess.
  2. Heat the oil in a wok or saucepan. When the oil reaches 150°C scatter the basil leaves into the wok and stir for about 20 seconds until the basil crisps and turns translucent. Remove from the wok and drain. Increase the heat of the oil to 170°C and fry the chicken in batches for about 3 minutes until golden brown, regularly skimming any floating flour bits from the oil.
  3. For the spiced salt, mix the salt and other seasonings together and toast in a dry frypan over low-medium heat for 2 minutes or until fragrant.
  4. To serve, toss the chicken with the fried basil leaves and a good pinch of the spiced salt. Serve immediately.

This recipe and many more like it can be found in my fourth book, Adam Liaw’s Asian Cookery School.

Adam Liaw's Asian Cookery School

How to Cook Fried Rice – Egg Fried Rice

Egg Fried Rice

CLICK HERE FOR A FULL VIDEO OF THIS RECIPE.

The first thing you need to know about wok cooking is that oil is very important. To carry flavour around your dish, flavour the oil first. If you want to learn good wok technique, this simple fried rice is a good choice.

Ingredients

3 eggs

1 tsp sesame oil

¾ tsp salt

4 cups leftover cooked jasmine rice, cold

2 tbsp vegetable oil

3 spring onions, finely sliced

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 tbsp soy sauce

¼ tsp white pepper

Method

  1. Beat the eggs with the sesame oil and ¼ tsp of salt. Heat the wok over medium-high heat and add the vegetable oil. Add half the spring onions, garlic and the remaining salt and fry until fragrant. Add the rice and soy sauce and toss to coat in the oil, pressing the rice against the side of the wok to break up any clumps.
  2. When the rice softens and begins to toast, move all the rice to one side of the wok and add the egg mixture to the open side. Stir the eggs until they are nearly set, then combine with the rice. Add the remaining spring onions and white pepper and toss through.

This recipe is from Adam Liaw’s Asian Cookery School, page 78.

Adam Liaw's Asian Cookery School

How to Cook Asian Greens

Oiled Greens

If you’ve always wanted to make Asian greens taste like the dish you order in a Chinese restaurant, this is how.

Ingredients

1 bunch Chinese broccoli (gai lan) (about 250g)

2 tbsp salt

1 tbsp vegetable oil

 

Oyster Sauce

¼ cup oyster sauce

¼ cup coarse stock, chicken stock or water

¼ tsp cornflour mixed with 1 tbsp stock or water

 

Method

  1. Trim the Chinese broccoli of any dry ends and rinse it well in cold water. Cut into 10cm lengths, grouping together the thick stalks, thin stalks and leaves separately. Split any very thick stalks in half lengthwise.
  2. Bring 2L of water to a rolling boil and add the salt. Add the thick stalks and boil for about a minute, then add the thin stalks and the leaves on top. Pour over the vegetable oil and boil for a further 2 minutes, occasionally shaking the greens in the water with tongs or chopsticks to coat them in the oil and to dissolve the salt into the water. Remove from the water and drain well.
  3. For the oyster sauce, bring the oyster sauce and stock to a simmer, then add the cornflour mixture. Stir until thickened then remove from the heat.
  4. Serve the greens as they are, or with some of the oyster sauce poured over the top.

CLICK HERE FOR A VIDEO OF THIS RECIPE. 

This recipe is from Adam Liaw’s Asian Cookery School, page 133.

 

Adam Liaw's Asian Cookery School

Mulligatawny Soup

Mulligatawny Soup

For more recipes and great food ideas, follow me on Instagram. For recipe videos, hit up my Youtube channel.

This soup was born out of the times of the British Raj, with obvious English and Indian influences. The addition of rice is all important, and I like it when it’s cooked almost to a porridge-y consistency.

Ingredients

1 tbsp each butter and olive oil

1 large onion, finely diced

3 cloves garlic

1½ tbsp curry powder

1 tsp garam masala

2 tsp salt

1 can diced tomatoes (400g)

1.5L chicken stock

½ cup washed uncooked brown rice, or jasmine rice

1 Granny smith apple, peeled and finely diced

1 carrot, peeled and finely diced

1 small sweet potato, peeled and finely diced

2 cups cooked shredded chicken (optional)

coriander and yoghurt, to serve

 

Method

 

  1. Heat a large pot over high heat and fry the onion and garlic in the butter and olive oil. Add the curry powder, garam masala, salt and tomatoes and fry for a minute until the spices are fragrant.
  2. Add the chicken stock and the brown rice and simmer covered for one and a half hours, stirring occasionally. Add the apple, carrot and sweet potato and simmer for a further 30 minutes. Adjust for seasoning with a little salt if necessary.
  3. Stir through the Shredded chicken and a little yoghurt, and scatter with chopped coriander to serve.

This recipe is from my third cookbook, Adam’s Big Pot.

Adam's-Big-Pot-Cover-(Low-Res-Web)

Fish Sauce Roast Chicken

Fish Sauce Roast Chicken (1 of 1)

 

For more recipes and great food ideas, follow me on Instagram. For recipe videos, head over to my Youtube channel.

If you sometimes get sick of the same old roast chicken, the sticky Thai flavours in this bird will be a welcome change. Even if you don’t like fish sauce, don’t be deterred; all that’s left of that fishy, pungent taste after roasting is a thick, caramelised glaze that’s full of flavour.

Ingredients

1 whole 1.75kg free-range chicken

1 red onion, peeled and chopped into eighths

Marinade

1/3 cup (80mls) fish sauce

1 whole coriander plant, roughly chopped (including one single root, and all stems and leaves), some leaves reserved for garnish

1 clove garlic, sliced

2 tbsp caster sugar

3 birdseye chillies, finely sliced

juice of ½ lemon

Method

  1. Heat your oven to 180C (fan-forced). Mix all of the marinade ingredients together, and stir well to dissolve the sugar. Set aside while you prepare the chicken.
  2. Rinse the chicken under running water and pat it dry inside and out with paper towel.  [Update: Recent British NHS guidelines released after this post recommend against washing poultry before cooking.] With kitchen scissors or a heavy knife, cut down either side of the backbone of the chicken and remove the backbone completely. Remove the wishbone if you like, as this will make carving the breast easier after the chicken is cooked. Press down on the breast of the chicken to flatten it. (Discard the backbone or, if you prefer, chop it into large pieces and place the pieces into the roasting tray to add more flavor to the pan juices.)
  3. Work your fingers under the skin of the breast and thighs. Spoon the marinade over the inside and outside of the chicken, as well as between the skin and meat, getting as much of the solid ingredients in the marinade under the skin as you can. Place the onion in a roasting tray and lay the chicken skin-side up on top of the onion.
  4. Roast for 45 minutes, basting every 15 minutes. Remove the chicken when the skin is dark and caramelised (it will be darker than a normal roast chicken from the caramelised sugars), and the meat is only just cooked through. Rest the chicken in a warm place for at least 10 minutes.
  5. While the chicken is resting, pour the juices from the pan into a jug, leave the onions in the tray. Skim off any liquid fat. Pour the juices back into the roasting pan with the onions and place the pan over heat. Stir the pan juices together with the onions and scrape up any bits stuck to the bottom of the pan. Spoon the sauce and onions over the chicken, scatter with the reserved coriander leaves and serve.

This recipe appears in my second cookbook, Asian After Work.

AAW Cover - Web